Lifetime Wellness

Insulin Resistance

 

To help illustrate what this does to your body, you must first understand how your body takes the food you eat and turns it into energy. Whatever you eat (carbohydrates, proteins, fat) must be turned into glucose in order for your body to use it as fuel. Your pancreas secretes insulin to help the glucose to get into the individual cells. For some reason that is not completely understood, people with insulin resistance require more insulin than normal for glucose to be used. It stimulates the intestinal fat cells to multiply (thus the tendency for excessive weight gain in the abdominal area) It causes the enzyme, lipase, not to work properly (thus fat is stored instead of being broken down).

Insulin resistance is thought to affect the hypothalamus in the brain and stimulates the hunger center. The fastest way to satisfy hunger is through ingestion of carbohydrates and it is believed that this is why people with insulin resistance are said to be “carb cravers”. As we know, the ingestion of carbohydrates in turn stimulates the secretion of insulin which in turn stimulates hunger and the cycle repeats itself.

Insulin resistance is still not totally understood, but we do know it creates a significant impact on a person's health.  There are three times in life that those who are genetically prone to insulin resistance see an increase in insulin levels.  The first time in life is during adolescence where we see an irregularity in the monthly cycle, excessive hair growth, and weight gain.  The second time is while pregnant.  All pregnant women are more insulin resistant, but those who are genetically prone to insulin resistance see more of a change.  The third time is during menopause.  During each one of these transitions in life, the amount of insulin used to get glucose into the cells increases resulting in the side effects of an overproduction of insulin, such as weight gain.  

Insulin resistance does not go away and can not be ignored.  For some, understanding the causes and effects of insulin resistance and making a diet change is enough.  This diet includes consuming a high amount of protein, about 100 grams a day, and a low amount of carbohydrates, about 50 grams a day.  In order to reach the daily goal of consuming 100 grams of protein a day, we offer a whey protein shake.  We also recommend foods that have a low glycemic index.  For others, medication, as well as a change in diet may be necessary.  Some physcians recommend a form of the medication Metformin in order to treat the insulin resistance.  This medication is extremely safe and effective in reducing a person's insulin resistance.   

Written by Jaime McCord — March 07, 2012

Shake Recipes!

Our whey protein shakes taste great no matter how you make them, but if you are looking for a little variety, here are a few of our tried and true recipes.  Enjoy!

Sour Lemon Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free lemon pudding (1.0oz)
Add 1 tablespoon of heavy whipping cream
Add fresh lemon juice to taste
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Strawberry Kiwi Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free strawberry kiwi jello (0.3oz)
Add 3-4 fresh or no sugar added frozen strawberries
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Banana and Strawberry Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free banana cream pudding (1oz)
Add 3-4 fresh or no sugar added frozen strawberries
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Lime Creamsicle
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free lime jello (0.3oz)
Add 1 tablespoon of heavy whipping cream
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Reese Cup Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla or chocolate shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free chocolate pudding (1.0oz)
Add 1 tablespoon of crunchy peanut butter
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Fruit Mix-up Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla or chocolate shake powder
Add 2-3 strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries
Add 1 teaspoon of heavy whipping cream
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Vanilla Vanilla Vanilla Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free vanilla pudding (1.0oz)
Add 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
Sprinkle ground cinnamon to taste
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Butterscotch Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free butterscotch pudding (1 oz)
Add 1 tablespoon of heavy whipping cream
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Café Mocha Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of cold brewed coffee
Add two scoops of vanilla or chocolate shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free chocolate pudding (1.0oz)
Add 1 teaspoon of heavy whipping cream
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Almond Pistachio
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of pistachio sugar free pudding (1 oz)
Add 1 teaspoon of almond extract
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds
Banana Nut Shake
In a blender, mix 6-8 ice cubes with 6 ounces of water
Add two scoops of vanilla shake powder
Add 1/3 package of sugar free banana cream pudding (1oz)
Add 1 tablespoon of crunchy peanut butter
Mix in blender for 20-30 seconds

Written by Jaime McCord — March 07, 2012

What is PCOS?

One of the common questions asked is, are there blood tests to tell for sure if you have PCOS? The answer is no. Primarily, medical history and physical appearance make the diagnosis. The medical literature discusses many different laboratory values but so far, none has been found to diagnose PCOS consistently. Some helpful tests would be an insulin level, FSH and LH levels (female hormones), a blood glucose level, and ultrasound. Approximately 60% of the patients with PCOS will have abnormal levels of the above or will have an abnormal ultrasound. In other words, an elevated insulin level will only be found in 60% of the women with PCOS. When patients had ultrasounds, only 50-60% of the women with PCOS had abnormal ultrasounds and 20% of normal women had abnormal ultrasounds. This illustrates why this is such a difficult disorder to diagnose and why many doctors do not recognize it. We have found the "Foley Score" to be quite accurate in determining which women actually have PCOS.

What is PCOS? It is a genetic disorder common in women with a family history of PCOS and/or a history of a parent, particularly a father, with elevated cholesterol, heart disease, and history of being overweight. Many times it first becomes noticeable in the late childhood/early teen years with abnormal weight gain. Poor eating habits or lack of exercise do not bring it on. It is a complex hormonal problem with effects on many body systems. The good news is that it can be treated!

The major component of this disorder is insulin resistance. To help illustrate what this does to your body, you must first understand how your body takes the food you eat and turns it into energy. Whatever you eat (carbohydrates, proteins, fat) must be turned into glucose in order for your body to use it as fuel. Your pancreas secretes insulin to help the glucose to get into the individual cells. For some reason that is not completely understood, people with insulin resistance require more insulin than normal for glucose to be used. The excessive insulin and/or the abnormal response to insulin cause most of the abnormalities seen in PCOS.

  • Insulin resistance causes the ovaries not to work properly.
  • It may cause cysts to form (thus the name polycystic ovarian syndrome)
  • It may stimulate cells in the ovaries to secrete extra amounts of androgens (male hormone) and thereby not allow regular ovulation (thus the irregular periods and difficulty getting pregnant experienced by many women with PCOS)
  • The excessive secretion of androgens also leads to male pattern hair growth and/or male pattern baldness (thus the increased facial, chest, and abdominal hair growth experienced by many women with PCOS) and excessive acne
  • Insulin resistance leads to weight gain.

Treatment

The hallmark of treatment of PCOS is the treatment of insulin resistance. This has two major components; medical and nutritional. Our nutritional program is covered separately on this site.

Medication

The current medication recommended is Metformin or Glucophage. It is very safe and is even continued during pregnancy without adverse effects to the woman or the unborn child. The only contraindication to taking Metformin is for those patients with kidney disease. Metformin works by allowing insulin to work more efficiently and by decreasing the resistance. This allows the pancreas to secrete less insulin thus decreasing the amount of insulin circulating in the blood and therefore decreasing the side effects mentioned earlier. It also appears to decrease the absorption of glucose in the intestine, which explains the most common side effect - increased intestinal gas and loose stools. If the appropriate foods are eaten, this side effect is minimal. There are many research studies on file that show there is no need to monitor blood sugar levels while on Metformin.

Written by Shopify — February 13, 2012

Welcome

Thank you for choosing Lifetime Wellness! We are excited for you to see our NEW website that will enable us to bring you the same great products, as well as add many more in the upcoming weeks.